Serving Arizona State University Online Since 1995  Current Issue: Thursday, February 23, 2006



STUDENT MEDIA LINKS








SEARCH
FEATURES
LINKS

 

 

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Holding on to Hope
On the cover
Shaney McCoy is a middle-class white woman from Clearwater, Kan. Raised in a Christian home, she's played by the rules most of her life. She's doesn't drink, she's not sexually promiscuous, she doesn't touch drugs and she's certainly never shared needles with anyone.

But this blonde-haired, blue-eyed picture of wholesome Midwestern values does share something with drug users, street workers and many poverty stricken people around the world.

Shaney McCoy is HIV positive. And she's not ashamed of it. In fact, she wants you to know it can happen to you. "This is a virus," says the psychology senior. "It doesn't choose who it infects."

Local Limelight: Q&A with William F#cking Reed
Tiffany Tcheng / STATE PRESS MAGAZINE
William F#cking Reed says that even though his dance night rocks, Phoenix will never be as cool as New York or London. DJ William F#cking Reed is the Clark Kent of the local club scene -- smart marketing manager by day and promoter, DJ and all-round savior of rock and roll by night. Reed's main gig is on a Saturday night, where he squeezes out of his tight denim shirts and into Rogue Bar's coffin-sized DJ booth.

From here he hosts the massively popular "Shake!" an eclectic mix of indie, post-punk and British invasion that accommodates most of Phoenix's sweaty, pierced and belligerent alternative crowd.

The night has risen rapidly in popularity since its conception, and last week celebrated its first anniversary. Among the balloons and sweaty masses, Reed took some time out to talk with SPM.

Tick Tock: Taking Care of Business
Tiffany Tcheng / STATE PRESS MAGAZINE
Miles Campos, a Chinese language major, says he sets the alarm on his cell phone to remind himself when assignments and tests are coming up. At 5 a.m. on Monday when your alarm goes off, the snooze button feels like your only friend. The party weekend is over.

The party weekend is over.

Frat Talk: The Good Boys
Tiffany Tcheng / STATE PRESS MAGAZINE
Patrick Spomer, president SigEp, says the organization worked hard to restore its reputation after the chapter lost its charter in 2002. At the Native New Yorker Restaurant on Dorsey Lane and Broadway Road, a large group of fraternity brothers assemble for a night out.

At first glance the scene looks pretty average; a sprinkling of creatively-perched baseball caps, some muscle shirts, mountains of food. But something's wrong.

Top 5: Tempe Scenic Views
Tiffany Tcheng / STATE PRESS MAGAZINE
1. "A" Mountain:
The required hike up "A" Mountain in BIO 100: The Living World shouldn't be the only time you make this trek. Sure, you won't get credit for it, but you'll get a great bird's eye view of the Tempe Town Lake, Sun Devil Stadium and the entire ASU campus.

It's All Relative: Roommate Rules
Maybe it was your freshman-year roommate whose sweaty gym socks grew mold in the corner. Perhaps it was that friend from high school who you thought would be your perfect roomie match and ended up being a psycho.

Regardless of the specific situation, one thing's for sure: no college student has ever lived in peaceful, perfect roommate bliss for all four (or more) years of their university life.

Stick It: Higher Calling
Scott Pennelly / STATE PRESS MAGAZINE
Call, known as Arhythmatik in the Christian hip-hop scene, puts up fliers for his show. God, Mormons and Phoenix probably aren't three of the first things that come to mind when you hear someone mention hip-hop. But with the rising popularity of Clayton Call and his friends, that may all soon change.

Call, known as Arhythmatik on stages around the Valley, is one of the founding members of the record label Modurn Languaj Asosiashun, or MLA for short.

Off Key: Where's the Love?
According to what I learned in my Sex, Love, and Romance class at ASU, more people break up on Valentine's Day than get together. Fortunately, my relationship survived. But over a week later, I'm still thinking about a failed attempt at a Valentine's Day mix CD.

Liner Notes: CD Reviews
Cast King recorded a few songs for Sun Records -- home to Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Elvis, among others -- way back in the 50s, before disappearing from the music scene. I don't know what he sounded like back then, but Saw Mill Man is a great collection of songs that sound like country should. King, now 79, recorded the album on his front porch, picking his guitar and singing songs about heartache and, well, heartache. The best comparison would be to the late Johnny Cash -- songs like "Wino" and the title track are simple stories brought to life by King's steady voice and Southern accent. In an age when pop country is all about big sound, this is a breath of fresh air. -- benjamin.horowitz@asu.edu

Calendar: What's Happening
Maybe you think you're too young to attend a performance of songs by Cole Porter, the American composer and songwriter who rose to fame in the 1930s. But don't even try to tell us that you don't hum along to Porter's songs, "I Get a Kick Out of You" and "I've Got You Under My Skin." Take a break from emo and pop for a trip down memory lane. Have a feel-good evening, and think about what it would have been like to live during an era where everything just seemed simpler. "Anything Goes" is at the Orpheum Theatre (203 W. Adams Street, Phoenix) at 8:00 p.m. on Friday and 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. on Saturday. Tickets are $20 to $25. For more information, call (602) 262-7272.

Editorial: From the Edge
In the early 80s a virus was discovered that changed the world. It changed the way we think about sex, social behavior and poverty.

The virus, made a mockery of the immune system -- turning a mechanism designed to protect our bodies into a ticking time bomb.


Gadget Corner: Window on the Future
Windows Vista, Microsoft's next big operating system, is going to be released near the end of the year. Windows Vista will be the biggest thing to hit the PC world since Windows 1.0 replaced MS-DOS.

Unlike its predecessors, Windows Vista will feature a 3D desktop. The 3D desktop will give users more freedom to express their individuality, thanks to the new dynamic backgrounds.

Sponsors
RC Helicopters


Copyright 2001-06, ASU Web Devil. All rights reserved. No reprints without permission.

Online Editor In Chief: Jolie McCullough | Online Adviser: Jason Manning | Technical Contact: Jason Wulf

Contact Info | Privacy Policy