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Local Limelight: Q&A with Zac Casey

 by Ben Horowitz
 published on Thursday, January 26, 2006

<em>Photo courtesy of Zac Casey (Pure Volume)</em><br>
He might be a resident assistant, but Zac Casey doesn’ spend all his time patrolling the hall enforcing quiet hours — he knows how to rock too. Check him out this weekend at Four White Walls./issues/arts/695409
Photo courtesy of Zac Casey (Pure Volume)
He might be a resident assistant, but Zac Casey doesn’ spend all his time patrolling the hall enforcing quiet hours — he knows how to rock too. Check him out this weekend at Four White Walls.
 

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Zac Casey says he imagined himself going to ASU since he was a kid. After spending most of his life in Seattle's rain and fog, he was lured to the desert with the promise of year-round sunshine, and, as an ex-golfer, the nice golf courses in the area. Casey, an education junior, came to the Valley armed with a guitar and an array of songs that has increased over the past three years. He recently released an EP titled Different the Same Way. A resident assistant in Manzanita Hall, Casey took a break from patrolling the halls to talk with SPM.

SPM: So, you've lived in the extreme rain and, now, the extreme heat. Which is better?

Zac Casey: Well, the Arizonian winter is about the same as the Seattle summer. So I get the best of both worlds.

SPM Do you write sadder songs in all that rain?

Casey: Actually, I do write sadder songs when I'm at home.

SPM You use a lot of pedals when you play.

Casey: When people see a guy with an acoustic guitar, they expect one thing, and I try to give them something a little different. That's why I do fun covers, since a lot of my stuff is kind of emo-driven indie pop -- kind of mellow. It's kind of depressing.

SPM As a singer-songwriter, do you prefer the quiet coffeehouse or a bigger stage?

Casey: I like the stage. It kind of depends. Because I use so many effects, the bigger the venue, the better you can hear me.

SPM You describe yourself as indie and emo. What do those terms even mean anymore?

Casey: Indie, to me, it still means independent. Like a song you won't hear on the radio. That's what indie means. Emo means a very heavy lyrical base in emotion.

SPM Do the residents on your floor ever complain about you rocking out during quiet hours?

Casey: Weekly! I do get complaints, but I always shut up when I do. I let my residents know from the beginning that they should just let me know when to turn it down.

SPM On the new record, your sound features several instruments. Have you ever thought about playing with a band in a live setting or otherwise?

Casey: I'd definitely be open to expanding my sound. I tried to find a band when I moved down here, but I didn't find anyone who was into anything I was into, so I decided to do my own thing.

SPM As an education major, what's in the future for your music? Are you hoping to make a career out of it?

Casey: I don't really have any aspirations to be on MTV. The idea of being able to tour around the country and play songs for people is awesome, but I also have this dream of being a teacher.

Reach the reporter at benjamin.horowitz@asu.edu.



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