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University's cooling costs not looking so hot


Jeremiah Armenta / THE STATE PRESS
Boiler No. 1 starts up at the Central Heating and Cooling Plant at ASU Tuesday.
Jennifer Pendergrass sat in her office, bundled in a sweater, on a hot September day.

At 63 degrees, the language and literature adviser's office was more Arctic than comfortable.

At 63 degrees, the language and literature adviser's office was more Arctic than comfortable.

"I resorted to bringing sweaters," she said. "When it was 113 degrees outside, I was freezing inside."

Pro-life clinic attracting students

Offering inexpensive sexually transmitted disease testing and a pro-life stance, a new Tempe pregnancy clinic is attracting some ASU students away from other sexual health alternatives.
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SPORTS

M Hoops: Devils look to keep it rolling

The ASU men's basketball team took a significant step in silencing its critics Monday night as it cruised by the University of California Santa Barbara, its biggest hurdle to date.

The Sun Devils broke from a halftime tie to dominate a team that just two days prior had stayed within 20 points of defending national champion North Carolina.
SPORTS

Frisbee: ASU club gives rover a run for his money

The Frisbee has expanded its influence beyond fetch with Lassie in the park. Evolved from a casual game of toss, the familiar saucer-shaped disk is now the center of the growing sport of ultimate Frisbee.

ASU's Ultimate Frisbee Club recently competed in the Southern California Warm-ups Tournament in San Diego, Calif. The collegiate competition hosted 16 southwestern teams.
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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Pins & Needles


On the cover
When psychology senior Jaclyn Trecokas was a freshman in college, drinking a glass of milk was enough to leave her body writhing in pain. But today she says she can eat or drink whatever she wants thanks to acupuncture, an ancient healing method. And she's not alone.

According to a 2002 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, acupuncture has become one of the leading forms of alternative healing in the United States helping to solve ailments ranging from bone injuries to drug addiction. While needling patients for treatment is a far cry from conventional Western medical practice, a growing interest by the American public in alternative healing has led them to discover a different path to better health.
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Acupuncture: How does it work?

Acupuncture is more than just sticking needles into random parts of the body -- there's actually a science behind it. According to Jo Condra, a licensed acupuncturist at Essential Chiropractic Acupuncture and Massage Therapy in Scottsdale, the ancient medicine treats patients through treating their energy, or "qi."
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Fashion: Heart of Brass

Tempe fashionistas may still find themselves traveling to hip locations in Scottsdale in search of the newest trends, but their search for style no longer needs to be a day trip.
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