Serving Arizona State University Online Since 1995  Current Issue: Friday, November 18, 2005



STUDENT MEDIA LINKS








SEARCH
FEATURES
LINKS

 

 


TOP STORIES

Prof's studies suggest life molded from clay


Chris Atwood / THE STATE PRESS
The controversy of whether man was created from clay or evolved over time has fueled debates for decades.

Now, both viewpoints might be one step closer to being reconciled, as new findings by geology professor Lynda Williams have linked clay minerals with the beginning of life.

International enrollment up

Shorter waits for student visas and University efforts to reduce perceptions of American hostility toward international students helped increase foreign student enrollment for the first time in four years, University officials said.

International student enrollment at ASU increased to 3,055 students this fall, about 8 percent more than the 2,779 students at ASU in fall 2004, according to the Office of Institutional Analysis. The 2004 figure represented a 17 percent decline from 3,348 foreign students in fall 2001.

Week celebrates international culture

Art exhibits, multicultural mixers and presentations by world leaders were some of the events students attended for International Education Week in an effort to globalize themselves and learn about different cultures.

The ASU International Programs Office, along with on-campus organizations and community groups, put on ASU's International Education Week this week to raise global awareness. The event was celebrated in more than 100 countries across the globe.
more CAMPUS NEWS
more WEB EXTRA
more OPINIONS
SPORTS

Football: Rivalry game stirs old regrets

It was the drop heard "round the state."

When ASU marched into Arizona Stadium last November, no one expected the Wildcats to put up much of a fight. But rivalry games are never easy to predict, and there the Sun Devils stood, trailing by seven points with a fourth-and-10 late in the second half.
SWIMMING/DIVING

Swimming and Diving: ASU hopes to make waves against LA schools

Pac-10 foes come to town Friday and Saturday as the ASU men's and women's swimming and diving teams will get their first look at conference competition this season.
more MORE SPORTS
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Pins & Needles


On the cover
When psychology senior Jaclyn Trecokas was a freshman in college, drinking a glass of milk was enough to leave her body writhing in pain. But today she says she can eat or drink whatever she wants thanks to acupuncture, an ancient healing method. And she's not alone.

According to a 2002 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, acupuncture has become one of the leading forms of alternative healing in the United States helping to solve ailments ranging from bone injuries to drug addiction. While needling patients for treatment is a far cry from conventional Western medical practice, a growing interest by the American public in alternative healing has led them to discover a different path to better health.
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Acupuncture: How does it work?

Acupuncture is more than just sticking needles into random parts of the body -- there's actually a science behind it. According to Jo Condra, a licensed acupuncturist at Essential Chiropractic Acupuncture and Massage Therapy in Scottsdale, the ancient medicine treats patients through treating their energy, or "qi."
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Fashion: Heart of Brass

Tempe fashionistas may still find themselves traveling to hip locations in Scottsdale in search of the newest trends, but their search for style no longer needs to be a day trip.
more MORE A&E
more COMICS
Sponsors
RC Helicopters


Copyright 2001-06, ASU Web Devil. All rights reserved. No reprints without permission.

Online Editor In Chief: Jolie McCullough | Online Adviser: Jason Manning | Technical Contact: Jason Wulf

Contact Info | Privacy Policy