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Local Limelight: Q&A with Lydia

 by Grayson Steinberg
 published on Thursday, November 17, 2005

<em>Photo courtesy of Tim Harmon</em><br>
Lydia might be down a member (that cute blonde in the foreground of this picture has left to pursue another project), but SPM still loves them. The band is currently touring the United States for its new album This December; Itís One More and Iím Free./issues/arts/694953
Photo courtesy of Tim Harmon
Lydia might be down a member (that cute blonde in the foreground of this picture has left to pursue another project), but SPM still loves them. The band is currently touring the United States for its new album This December; Itís One More and Iím Free.
 

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The members of Gilbert's Lydia are so dedicated to each other, they wouldn't sacrifice anyone even if it was the only way to escape from a raging sandstorm. The indie-rock band is comprised of guitarist and vocalist Leighton Antelman, guitarist Steve McGraw, bassist Evan Armbul and drummer Loren Brinton.

SPM chatted with Lydia during its current tour about the hellish recording process of its full-length album, This December; It's One More and I'm Free and the death of its touring trailer.

Sadly, Lydia had to cancel its upcoming hometown gig, but Antleman says local fans can look forward to a show sometime in the next two months.

SPM: Was the recording process for the album happy-go-lucky, tense or somewhere in between?

Antelman: It was more tense and under the gun. It was like the way I would never want to record an album again. We had to record it in eight-hour blocks, and it was really rushed.

Brinton: The recording process was a disaster. We started recording in this commercial studio in Tempe. I can't really drop the name because of legal reasons. We recorded the album there, and we weren't happy with it, so we took all the tracks and we went to Cory Spotts of BLUElight AudioMedia. He's done most local stuff, like the Stiletto Formal, Goodbye Tomorrow and Greeley Estates. We took tons of time redoing stuff that we weren't satisfied with in the first studio.

SPM: How do you manage to combine influences as schizophrenic as Eminem and Pink Floyd?

Brinton: Pulling from different influences is what makes us what we are. Steve has a lot of older psychedelic stuff, so he adds that kind of stuff to our music with a lot of effects. Leighton and I are usually on the same page. We haven't quite written yet with Evan, because he joined the band while we were recording the album.

SPM: What's the craziest backstage moment you've ever had on tour?

Brinton: We flipped our trailer in Montana. We were going around a big loop and flipped the trailer going from one highway to another. It pretty much broke the axle. The trailer was just in shambles inside. [Our manager] got the trailer towed to Billings, Mont. We drove to Missoula, [Mont.], in the van and used all of that equipment and played a show that night. Then the manager got the trailer fixed, drove it to Missoula, and we drove to Oregon. Pretty intense 24 hours, I'd say.

SPM: If you were caught in a deadly sandstorm and could only escape if you sacrificed a band member, who would you give up?

Antelman: We're already down a member, so we can't afford to lose anyone else. I don't think we could really lose another member; otherwise, we couldn't be a band.

Brinton: If the band had to go on without one person, I would sacrifice myself. We're like brothers. It's hard to kick one person out.

Reach the reporter at grayson.steinberg@asu.edu.



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