Serving Arizona State University Online Since 1995  Current Issue: Thursday, October 27, 2005



STUDENT MEDIA LINKS








SEARCH
FEATURES
LINKS

 

 

Halloween: Favorite Haunt

We send our staff 'ghostbuster' to investigate Phoenix's Hotel San Carlos

 by Gabriel Trujillo
 published on Thursday, October 27, 2005

The Hotel San Carlos, located in downtown Phoenix, is one of the most haunted hotels in America. The ghost of Leone Jenson, who jumped to her death from the hotelís roof, is just one of the many spirits said to wander the halls of the San Carlos. Here our photographer re-creates a ghostly image in front of the haunted hotel. /issues/arts/694617
Deanna Dent / STATE PRESS MAGAZINE
The Hotel San Carlos, located in downtown Phoenix, is one of the most haunted hotels in America. The ghost of Leone Jenson, who jumped to her death from the hotelís roof, is just one of the many spirits said to wander the halls of the San Carlos. Here our photographer re-creates a ghostly image in front of the haunted hotel.
 

advertisement

An American flag dances in the wind as it hangs from the roof of the Hotel San Carlos in downtown Phoenix.

The flag itself is nothing extraordinary, but its location has a gruesome and important significance. On May 7, 1928, Leone Jenson jumped to her death from the roof of the San Carlos. Jenson had an affair with a bellboy at a nearby hotel and couldn't live without him after he ended their relationship.

Since Jenson's death, several hotel employees and guests report seeing the white cloud of a woman walking the halls of the seventh floor.

After reading about Jenson and other bizarre occurrences on the hotel's Web site, I decide to do my own paranormal investigation.

While I will be hunting for ghosts, there won't be any brown jumpsuits or proton packs on this adventure. My apparition detection kit includes a digital video camcorder, digital camera and a tape recorder.

It's a little before 8 p.m. as I wait outside the San Carlos with my fellow amateur ghost hunter, my brother Matt Trujillo.

MSN.com ranks the hotel, located on Central and Monroe avenues, as one of the 10 most haunted hotels in the United States. And from the hotel's appearance, I can see why.

Antique oil paintings adorn the walls, and red velvet chairs are scattered across the lobby. As I check in to the hotel, a worn journal lays on the front desk. Inside, there are several entries of guests' unexplained experiences. One guest writes about seeing three children running down the hall on the second floor and suddenly disappearing as they turn the corner.

Our nerves are now almost completely frayed as we read a few journal entries, but I know it's time to begin our investigation.

I can see my reflection in the copper elevator doors as my brother and I make our way to the seventh floor.

Finally, we are standing in front of room 706, our place for the night. But as we open the door to our room, we see something a little unsettling. Room 706 is directly across from the stairway to the roof; the same stairway Jenson took before she jumped.

Also on the seventh floor is Rachel Miller. Miller is an elementary school teacher by day and a haunted-hotel tour guide by night. She was giving a tour to other guests, so we decided to join them.

Miller says Jenson is known to appear at the feet of the beds of many male guests of the seventh floor.

Our next stop: the basement. A worn, green couch and a broken desk sit in a dark corner. But the weathered furniture isn't the attraction; it's the well that provides water to the hotel.

Before the hotel was built in 1928, the grounds were home to Phoenix's first elementary school. Miller says it is believed that three children drowned in the well, and their spirits can still be seen and heard throughout the grounds of the San Carlos.

As Miller speaks to the group, my brother is taking photos when suddenly the camera shuts down. After several attempts, the camera appears to be malfunctioning. Since our equipment is not working, we make our way back to the lobby.

While waiting for the rest of the group, we examine the camera again when it suddenly turns on. We had put new batteries in the camera before our trip, so we don't know why it shut down.

I scroll through the photos taken in the basement when something strange appears on the screen. In three of the photos, the rooms appear to be filled with orbs, or small balls of energy. Miller says the orbs are signs of a paranormal presence.

After the tour is over, we head up to our room to investigate further. Once inside, we turn off the lights and start recording with our camcorder in night-vision mode. We record throughout the night, but nothing major occurs in the room beside the occasional unexplained bump and creak.

While we weren't possessed or awakened by the ghostly image of Leone Jenson, I believe the hotel is haunted. So the next time you encounter paranormal phenomenon, who are you going to call?

Not me.

Reach the reporter at gabriel.trujillo@asu.edu.



Print This Story, click here

Sponsors
RC Helicopters


Copyright © 2001-06, ASU Web Devil. All rights reserved. No reprints without permission.

Online Editor In Chief: Jolie McCullough | Online Adviser: Jason Manning | Technical Contact: Jason Wulf

Contact Info | Privacy Policy