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Police increase seat belt enforcement


David Lukens
David Lukens / THE STATE PRESS
ASU police are cracking down on drivers who do not follow seat belt laws this February. Officers will be working overtime to educate drivers who do not buckle up.
Tempe police will work overtime to crack down on drivers who don't wear seat belts this month.

The department will conduct extra patrols through Feb. 20 to enforce seat belt laws, funded by an $8,000 state grant. Police departments in 11 Arizona cities, including eight in the Valley, received funds from the Governor's Office of Highway Safety to pay for the overtime incurred by officers who will staff the added patrols.

MU gift shop closing doors after 4 years

Rita's Gift Shop is packing up and moving out. After four years in the Memorial Union, Rita's Gift Shop will close its doors April 1.

"[The MU] charge[s] an absurd amount of rent," said manager Jason Fitch. "You have to be a large franchise to survive." The MU charges Rita's $2,500 a month, year round for rent. During the summer, when fewer students are on campus, Rita's takes a loss.

New fraternity, sorority come to campus

Greek Life at ASU expanded this semester with the addition of sorority Delta Zeta and fraternity Sigma Alpha Mu, which were added to accommodate the increased number of students interested in the Greek community.

"There have been an increased number of women interested in Panhellenic sororities over the past five or six years, so another sorority was brought on," said Lara Klinkner, Greek Life Student Activity adviser.
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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Challenged beliefs


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ON THE COVER
With her veiled hair, modest clothing, and olive skin, pre-business junior Rema Nasaredden knows a thing or two about stereotyping.

Nasaredden says she was helping the Muslim Students Association at an informational table during the presidential debate when "this total right-wing Christian straight out of Texas walks up. He starts telling us how great it is that the U.S. is in Iraq and how what they are doing there is beautiful," she says.
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Wrist-bandits

The craze started with Nike. In 2004, the sprawling athletic company began manufacturing rubber wristbands for basketball players embossed with words such as Player, Baller and Respect.

The bands became officially mainstream last May when famous bicyclist and cancer survivor Lance Armstrong teamed with Nike to make a wristband solely to benefit cancer research. It is yellow and says, "Livestrong."
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